print PRINT

POLITICS

Spot opinion poll & results from Mainichi Shimbun

  • September 10, 2020
  • , Mainichi , p. 6
  • JMH Translation

Questions & answers (%)

(T = total; P = previous poll [conducted on Aug. 22, 2020]; M = male; F = female)

 

Q: Do you support the Abe cabinet?

 

 

T

P

M

F

Yes

50

(34)

56

44

No

42

(59)

39

45

No answer

8

(8)

5

11

 

Q: The Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) presidential election has been announced. The person elected to be president will be the next prime minister. If you were able to vote in the election, who would you vote for?

 

 

T

P

M

F

Shigeru Ishiba

36

 

34

39

Yoshihide Suga

44

 

48

40

Fumio Kishida

9

 

9

9

Don’t know

10

 

9

12

 

Q: Would you like to see the next prime minister continue the policies and political stance of the Abe administration or would you like to see him change them? 

 

 

T

P

M

F

Continue

33

 

40

24

Change

55

 

51

62

Unsure

11

 

8

12

 

Q: Some say that the new prime minister should ask for a mandate from the people by holding a Lower House election soon after he takes office. Others say that coronavirus countermeasures should be prioritized over an election now. Which is closer to your view?

 

 

T

P

M

F

A Lower House election should be held quickly

23

 

27

18

Coronavirus countermeasures should be prioritized

65

 

64

68

Unsure

11

 

9

12

 

Q: The Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan (CDPJ), the Democratic Party for the People (DPFP), and others have decided to merge to form a new party. Have your expectations for the opposition forces been raised because the two main opposition parties are merging to form a new political party?

 

 

T

P

M

F

My expectations have been raised

24

 

21

28

My expectations have been lowered

10

 

10

11

I didn’t expect much from the opposition parties in the first place

65

 

68

60

 

Q: Do you approve of the Abe administration’s handling of the new coronavirus?

 

 

T

P

M

F

Yes

29

 

32

25

No

47

 

45

50

Unsure

24

 

23

25

 

Q: Do you approve of the Abe administration’s economic policies?

 

 

T

P

M

F

Yes

45

 

51

36

No

35

 

33

39

Unsure

20

 

17

25

 

Q: Do you approve of the Abe administration’s social security policies?

 

 

T

P

M

F

Yes

29

 

30

27

No

41

 

41

41

Unsure

29

 

28

30

 

Q: Do you approve of the Abe administration’s foreign affairs and security policies?

 

 

T

P

M

F

Yes

57

 

63

49

No

27

 

24

31

Unsure

16

 

12

20

 

Q: Do you approve of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s political stance?

 

 

T

P

M

F

Yes

43

 

47

38

No

39

 

37

43

Unsure

17

 

15

19

 

Q: The second Abe administration was launched in December 2012. That was the year of the London Olympic and Paralympic Games and also the year when Tokyo Skytree opened. How have your living conditions changes compared with that time?

 

 

T

P

M

F

Improved

23

 

28

17

Worsened

24

 

24

25

Not changed

52

 

49

58

 

Q: Which political party do you support?

 

 

T

P

M

F

Liberal Democratic Party of Japan (LDP or Jiminto)

39

(29)

41

35

Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan (CDPJ or Rikken Minshuto)

8

(9)

7

10

Democratic Party for the People (DPFP or Kokumin Minshuto)

1

(2)

1

1

Komeito (Komeito)

4

(4)

3

5

Japanese Communist Party (JCP or Kyosanto)

4

(5)

3

4

Nippon Ishin (Japan Innovation Party) (Nippon Ishin no Kai)

8

(11)

9

6

Social Democratic Party (SDP or Shaminto)

1

(1)

1

1

Reiwa Shinsengumi (Reiwa Shinsengumi)

2

(2)

1

2

Party to Protect the People from NHK (NHK kara Kokumin wo Mamoru To)

0

(1)

0

0

Other political groups

1

(1)

1

0

None of the above (NOTA)

31

(36)

31

33

 

Note: Figures are rounded. “No answer” has been omitted, and “0” means that fewer than 0.5% of respondents selected that response.

 

Polling methodology: The survey was conducted by the Social Survey Research Center and the Mainichi Shimbun on Sept. 8 of those 18 years old or older. A computer-aided random digit sampling (RDS) method was used to generate phone numbers (both landlines and cell phones) randomly by computer, and an interactive voice response system was used to call those numbers. For mobile phones, people were asked through audio guidance to cooperate in the survey, and those who agreed to participate were sent a short message service (SMS) text message providing a link to an online answer form. For landline phones, respondents were asked questions by interactive voice response system and pushed buttons on their phones to indicate their answer. The target number of valid responses was set at 700 for mobile phones and 300 for landline phones. Valid responses were received from 730 mobile numbers and 301 landline phone numbers.

  • Ambassador
  • Ukraine
  • OPINION POLLS
  • COVID-19
  • Trending Japan