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SOCIETY > Human Rights

Ten Chinese arrested or referred to prosecutors for disrupting rallies

  • October 21, 2021
  • , Sankei , p. 27
  • JMH Translation

On Oct. 20, the Public Security Bureau of the Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department (TMPD) referred seven Chinese nationals to a public prosecutors office on the charge of forcible obstruction of business for obstructing a rally held in Tokyo in July this year to mourn victims of the Chinese government’s human rights oppression in Hong Kong and the Xinjiang Autonomous Region. As the Chinese government’s crackdown on human rights in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, Tibet, the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, and Hong Kong intensifies, the Japanese police are becoming increasingly alarmed by the systematic obstruction by the Chinese of rallies held in Japan.

 

The rally was held in Shinjuku Ward on July 1, the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Chinese Communist Party. People from the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, Tibet, and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, who live in Japan, participated in the rally as a memorial service for the victims of the Chinese government’s crackdown on human rights.

 

According to sources, during the rally, several Chinese people who were participating in the rally started shouting in Chinese, “Without the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), there would be no new China.” The participants tried to stop them, but the Chinese refused to stop shouting. As a result, the participants reported the matter to the Metropolitan Police Department.

 

The seven Chinese are charged with obstructing the progress of the rally held in Shinjuku Ward on the afternoon of July 1. The Public Security Bureau of the TMPD also arrested three other Chinese nationals on the charge of forcible obstruction of business and later released them.

 

During a demonstration against the Chinese government held by the same organizers in Shinjuku Ward at 6:30 p.m. on the same day, dozens of people who appeared to be Chinese wearing red shirts held up banners celebrating the 100th anniversary of the founding of the CCP and sang the Chinese national anthem, sources said.

 

“Chinese have disturbed us before, but this is the first time they did so in an organized manner,” said William Lee (sp?), 28, from Hong Kong, who participated in the rally and the demonstration. “I heard that China was recruiting via social networking services people to sabotage the demonstration by paying them an hourly wage.”

 

The Chinese government has been facing severe criticism from the international community for its ever-escalating hegemony, as evidenced by the suppression of speech in Hong Kong, human rights violations against ethnic minorities including the “genocide” against the Uyghurs in Xinjiang, and military pressure on Taiwan.

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