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Japan to boost aid for medical systems for infectious diseases

  • December 9, 2021
  • , Jiji Press , 9:40 p.m.
  • English Press

Tokyo, Dec. 9 (Jiji Press)–Japan’s health ministry hammered out on Thursday a plan to promote efforts to establish medical care systems capable of dealing with COVID-19 and other emerging infectious diseases.
 

In a draft basic policy for its medical fee revision for fiscal 2022, which starts in April, the ministry said that the establishment of such systems is a key task, adding that it will boost medical fees for efforts to admit more patients and strengthen coordination among medical institutions.

 

The draft was approved the same day by two subcommittees of the Social Security Council, which advises the health minister.

 

The fiscal 2022 medical fee revision will be the first full-scale overhaul since the COVID-19 outbreak.

 

In the draft, the ministry vowed to ensure medical care systems for sufficient outpatient care and hospitalization services, saying, “It is important to continue to make full efforts to address the novel coronavirus.”

 

Under the revised medical fee system, the ministry plans to reflect in medical fees its evaluations of medical institutions’ efforts to divide their roles efficiently in their respective regions to prepare for an outbreak of a new infectious disease.

 

When deciding medical fees, the ministry will also take into account pay hikes for nurses, reform of doctors’ work styles and efforts to promote infertility treatment. These measures were included in a package of economic stimulus measures endorsed at a cabinet meeting last month.

 

The government will fix the revision rate for fiscal 2022 overall medical fees by the end of this month.

 

From next month, the Central Social Insurance Medical Council, which advises the health minister, is scheduled to discuss the scope of insurance coverage for individual medical practices and the specific levels of medical fees.

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