SOCIETY > Youth

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SOCIETY > Youth

Young Japanese leaving stable jobs to give back to society

Instead of seeking stability in life, there are growing moves among the young generation in Japan to give back to society through social enterprises, even at the expense of leaving their stable, and often lucrative, jobs. According to TV-Tokyo’s economic documentary program “Gaia no Yoake” (3/23), a private survey found that among workers in their 20s and 30s, 46% said….Read more

  • April 6, 2016
  • , TVTokyo
  • Trending@Japan

SOCIETY > Culture

Vinyl and cassettes making a comeback among “digital natives”

In the 2015 movie bearing his own name, Steve Jobs told his daughter her Sony Walkman was tacky and promised her he would create a music player that would put “somewhere between 500 and 1,000 songs” in her pocket. The movie perhaps portrayed this as the moment the IT mogul came up with the idea for iTunes and the iPod….Read more

  • March 2, 2016
  • , NHK
  • Trending@Japan

POLITICS > Elections

Will enfranchised teens spell the end of Japan’s “silver democracy”?

Last year Japan lowered the voting age from 20 to 18. This change will allow some 2.4 million teens to cast their ballots for the first time in the House of Councillors election this summer. Much discussed here is whether this first amendment of the electoral law in 70 years will mean the end of the “silver democracy” in which….Read more

  • February 1, 2016
  • Trending@Japan

SOCIETY > Culture

Young Japanese seek security of government jobs

Ask Japanese college students about their career aspirations and you may be surprised to hear many of them say they would like to work for the government. The most popular “dream job” among young Japanese is civil servant, surpassing jobs at such corporate giants as Toyota, Mitsubishi-UFJ Bank, and Mitsui & Co., according to the results of a survey of….Read more

  • February 3, 2016
  • ,
  • Trending@Japan

SOCIETY

Less is more for young Japanese

Have you tried “kondo-ing” your closet yet? Marie Kondo, a Japanese organizing consultant who published the best-selling book, “The Life–Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing,” suggests that people should only keep objects and clothes that “spark joy” and throw away everything else in order to enjoy a less stressful and more peaceful life. As….Read more

  • August 26, 2015
  • , NHK
  • Trending@Japan

SOCIETY > Youth

Japanese youths “inward-looking”? Look again

Since the launch of this publication nearly two years ago, we’ve reported on a number of trends among young Japanese, including their tendency to be “inward-looking,” “play it safe,” have “little upward mobility,” and prefer “frugal lifestyles.” However, Naoko Kuga of Nippon Life Insurance Research Institute argues in her recent book entitled “Do young people really not have any money?”….Read more

  • September 24, 2014
  • , All newspapers and TV networks
  • Trending@Japan

SOCIETY > Youth

Collective defense? A collective shrug from Japanese youths

Some 10,000 people gathered in front of the Prime Minister’s Office on June 30 to express opposition to the decision by the cabinet of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to change Japan’s decades-old interpretation of the Constitution that has prohibited the nation from exercising its right to collective self-defense. Although there were young people at the rally, they were not a….Read more

  • July 2, 2014
  • , All newspapers and TV networks
  • Trending@Japan

SOCIETY > Youth

“Satisfied” Japanese youth not interested in politics

Noritoshi Furuichi, a 29-year-old sociologist, argues in his 2011 book titled “The Happy Youth of a Desperate Country” that Japanese youth are happy despite looming problems with their society, including economic disparities. Furuichi, a Ph.D. student at the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences of the University of Tokyo and a visiting scholar at Keio University’s SFC research center, said….Read more

  • April 16, 2014
  • , NHK
  • JMH Summary

SOCIETY

For 12-year-old poet, haiku is hope for life

“I have found hope for life through writing haiku,” says Rintaro Nishimura, a 12-year-old poet living in Osaka. Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry consisting of five, seven, and five syllables, respectively, in three phrases. Kobayashi Rin is Nishimura’s pen name, which was taken from Kobayashi Issa, a distinguished Edo-era haiku poet. Rin first encountered haiku in picture books….Read more

  • March 5, 2014
  • , All newspapers and TV networks
  • JMH Summary
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